SuperCali Blog

An ongoing  um-dittle-ittl-um-dittle-i of Communication & Education topics as they relate to 

Our Super Clients, Families & the Greater Community...

Super Success Story! 


As an elementary school student, Kwame struggled with speech and language issues in expressive communication. With integral therapy efforts by his SLP & the dedication of his mother, Kwame was able to  overcome his communication challenges. Today, he is an empowering educator and author. His first book, Shaping the Teacher Identity, guides individuals through a self-exploration of their life and helps them extract the inherent qualities that uniquely define who they are as educators. Kwame and his success today is an inspiration to parents, students & SLP's alike. Check out his blog & book here


What's Your Superpower? The "i Contribute" Toolkit


The ASHA State Education Advocacy Leaders (SEALs)are pleased to present educators & professionals with the “I Contribute” Toolkit. Every day, school professionals collaborate and work tirelessly to facilitate learning for all students. Yet, often, the professionals in the building or stakeholders in education are unaware of the various contributions SLP's make as part of the overall education mission. The “I Contribute” toolkit provides educators & professionals with Tools, Strategies, and Resources to plan and carryout effective advocacy and leadership opportunities to increase knowledge and awareness about the valuable contributions of school-based SLPs and Audiologists. Full Access here 

 JUNIOR LEAGUE OF BOSTON, INC *** BOARD SEAT INITIATIVE 2020


Studies show that diversity on boards of directors (including gender diversity) is an indicator of performance, leading boards to thrive and be inclusive of a broader picture and, in many cases positively impacting the bottom line. 

According to a recent study by McKinsey only 19% of C-suite employees are women.


The Junior League of Boston is a premier training organization giving women experiential leadership opportunities within the organization and in the community. 

Their Board Seat Initiative is designed to train women on governance, legal and fiduciary responsibilities of being a Board member, and help match members with prospective opportunities.


Please join us in support of our co-founder, Briana F. O'Neill, as she seeks to join the Board of Directors 

of the Junior League of Boston, Inc.  Briana has been an active member and contributor to the Junior League  of  Boston for 5 + years, now.  

We support our talented Co-founder, Briana, to serve on this non profit Board of Directors, of 

The Junior League of Boston, Inc,  an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. 

 Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable.


Please contact [email protected] in support of Briana 

and/or support her with your social media posts and comments of support on 

FB, Instagram, Pinterest et al.


Thank you!


March Is Women In History Month!




Boston Education Hearings 


   A Tribute to Black History Month:

On Monday, January 20th, as we celebrated MLK Day, I was honored to deliver the keynote address at Boston University during A Day of Celebration in Honor of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

It was such a fantastic event that honored not only the legacy of Dr. King, but also shined a spotlight on women who have

advocated for social justice in Boston, including Coretta Scott King and Sue Bailey Thurman.

The BU Band and Inner Strength Gospel Choir also performed the music of the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin.

Another event on MLK Day took place at the Museum of Fine Arts, where the winner of the

King Boston Essay Contest was revealed. Congratulations to Amelia Sanchez, a sophomore at

Boston Latin School, who took home first place for her essay which detailed the job

discrimination that those with Autism encounter.

I’d like to read an excerpt from that essay:

“One issue that is particularly important to me is rarely addressed, simply because there is still

so much stigma and bias surrounding it that few people are willing to question, and that is the

staggering unemployment rate of individuals with high functioning autism, with 85% of college

graduates on the autism spectrum unemployed. This is economic injustice, and as a high

functioning autistic teen, this is unacceptable to me. I believe that if Martin Luther King, Jr. was

alive today, he would be working to change this, as he played a large part in fighting for the

rights of those with disabilities, as well as playing his more well-known role as a black rights

activist. Capable people are being denied the American Dream, not because of a lack of skills or

ability, but because of deep rooted bias against those who think differently.”

 Read by Chairperson Michael Loconto

(Thank you, Amelia for finding the courage to use your essay as an opportunity to advocate.)